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August 16, 2011

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Comments

Joachim L.

How on earth would tethers have helped in this instance? They could have made a tenuous situation into a total disaster.

Tillerman

"Luckily"? Was it just luck they were all wearing life-jackets? I hope not. I hope it was good planning.

Bieigh (capt. rn ret.)

Sailboats have been racing for a long time w/o this type of disaster. In fact it is becoming almost common place for the canting ballast to fail, leak or fall off.

Someone needs to make the rules to reflect building boats that will still be sailing in 30 or 40 years. Savings a few seconds a mile by sacrificing sea keeping ability has its place I guess, but the boat will be a throw away in five years.

Adam Turinas

Joachim, did I say THEY should have been wearing tethers? I don't believe I did.

TMan, I think he means "Luckily" as in "Thank God we were all wearing lifepreservers" rather than "what a bit of good fortune"

Bieigh, sailboat racing has always been a dangerous sport and highly experienced crews like Rambler 100s know exactly what they are about. It's a sport with inherent dangers like motor-racing, (American) football and rugby.

Sadly there have always technology-related incidents. Even in the 1968 Golden Globe one of the boats fell apart. Back in the 1800s there are stories of boats foundering because the hull and keel were overpowered by the rig.

Thankfully in this instance, everyone was recovered unharmed.

David Duquette

When the chips are down, I reckon you could do a lot worse than to have Jerry Kirby on board. That guy exudes competence and class.

And kudos to the Royal National Lifeboat Institution fellows who rescued these sailors. That is a pretty damned amazing organization. I remember reading the stories of some of the RNLI medals awarded for bravery, and I couldn't lift my jaw off the floor. My understanding is that it's all volunteers. Incredible. My hat is off to them.

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