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January 27, 2010

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Michael

Dude, Moby Dick Rocks! Totally. Really.

In all seriousness it's a blast (don't mind the slow bits.) I didn't have it as an assignment, which is probably why I managed to enjoy it. And I've borrowed from it more than once on my blog (any time I'm babbling about an "insatiate maw" I'm lifting Ahab."

Adam Turinas

Ah now I understand you were babbling on about

Max

've been trying to read Moby Dick for nearly 10 years, I keep going back to it but less and less often.

Perhaps some of the classics don't suit the modern temprement, have you read conrad's Nostromo?

Get a copy of Treasure Island, even if you know the plot and the characters, its a great read - think 17th century Elmore Leonard!

Max

http://bursledonblog.blogspot.com/

EscapeVelocity

Growing up, we didn't read that much classic literature in school, but my mother was a former English teacher and pushed it hard. I used to read a lot when I was a) in grad school, with lots of stuff to procrastinate, and b) not in the same country as my mother. I read a lot of Thomas Hardy on the S-Bahn in Berlin. Oh, c) that was before the Internet, now my procrastination drug of choice.

I actually read Moby Dick a few years ago and found it pretty tough going. A friend has participated in a marathon reading they have in I believe New Bedford, which has got to be an experience.

Michael

(The obsessed, depressed, on a highway to hell Ahab speaking to the head of a slaughtered whale:)

"Where unrecorded names and navies rust, and untold hopes and anchors rot; where in her murderous hold this frigate earth is ballasted with bones of millions of the drowned; there in that awful water-land was thy most familiar home."

What's not to like? Colonial Kurtz goes fishing...

JP

Keep plugging away - it is worth it! One of the great American novels

Modern Shower Stall

Thanks for the post.

doug bristol

Download "The Project Gutenberg EBook of Moby Dick; or The Whale, by Herman Melville" from www.gutenberg.org and read it on your computer at your own pace. The unzipped html version is 1.25 MB.

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