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January 13, 2010

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spiderman

I'm pretty sure that in recent America's Cup matches the teams were allowed to buy certain equipment from other countries as long as the boat was assembled in the country of the yacht club of the challenger (or defender). But those Cups were sailed under rules agreed by mutual consent between the defender and the challenger of record. This Cup is being sailed under the original Deed of Gift which does require that the yacht be "constructed" in the country of the club concerned. Of course it all depends on what you mean by "constructed".

JP

Oh for heavens sake!!

Baydog

Bring back the Twelve Meters!

Carol Anne

Perhaps the parsers of the legalese should take a lesson from New Mexico, where the debate over what constitutes "genuine" Native American pottery, jewelry, and other crafts has been going on for decades. Here, the definitions involved are "made" vs. "crafted."

"Made" means created from scratch, so "American Indian Made" means the artist started with the raw materials and created the item.

"Crafted" means some hand work was done in the creation of the product, so "American Indian Crafted" means the item was probably mass produced by near-slave laborers in some Asian country, and a Native American put the finishing touches on it.

I would argue that "constructed" applies to the final assembly of the vessel, the same way that cars can be said to be "built in America" even if the factory that built them is owned by a foreign corporation and components that went into the car were created in other countries. Of course, then you get into the sticky area of a boat that is put together in one country for testing and such, and then disassembled for transport and re-assembled at the location of the race.

Oy veh.

greg

This is of no relevance, but thought I would share that I had a couple of drinks and dinner with Capt. JP at the Duke's Head last night. He reminded us that this is your favorite pub in Putney. :)

Pat

"American Indian Hand Made", I think.

Hmmm,

Maybe we should sponsor a regatta in New Mexico in which all the boats had to be...
"American Indian Hand Made".

And while we're on the subject, can someone help me understand all the bumper stickers about wanting illegal immigrants to leave the country? If all the uninvited immigrants were to be deported or leave, then how would the Navajo, Cherokees, Apaches, Seminoles, and other Native Americans run the whole country? Who would be left to take all the low-wage jobs?

bonnie

And how would all the other countries handle us deportees?

Bathroom Shower Stalls

Looks like alot of fun.

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